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Posts tagged ‘teachable opportunities’

Diary of an Unschooling Family, Day 10

It’s DAY 10!! I made it! I posted every day for 10 days and at least one person read it every day (thanks Ron!).

I started this blog as a way to illustrate what we’re doing, and why we’re doing it. Then came the challenge of writing 10 blogs in 10 days, and it seemed to align with that – what better way is there to see what we’re doing than for me to write about the day-to-day.

What has emerged for me out of this exercise is the need to de-mystify unschooling, or any kind of home education. People frequently say to me “I couldn’t do it!” and the implication is that I’m some kind of ever patient, ever supportive, ever talking-in-my-kind-voice supermum. Clearly, I’m not. I also think people assume that I’m super organised, and super motivated, and ready at all moments for the teachable opportunities, and just thinking about being all those things makes me exhausted, so if people think that’s what home education is about, then no wonder they think they couldn’t do it.

The reality is that in the history of humans, children have been raised to adulthood in their own environment much longer than children have been raised to adulthood in the artificial environment of school. We’re not doing anything new. I think that needs to be really clear. What we’re doing is nothing extra-ordinary, nothing earth shattering, but definitely radical.

All the times people ask me, “But what about …?” there are a hundred ways I can ask them back, “But what about …?” Our kids aren’t missing out on anything that’s not being made up for in a myriad of ways that mostly only fellow home educators understand.

Today we spent a couple of hours in the sunshine up at the beach.
When we got home, Joss beat the eggs for our omelette, and Louis toasted the bread.
They watched Jake and the Neverland Pirates, Kratt Brothers, and played Minecraft.
Louis helped me spread compost and hay, and water the garden. Joss floated around doing something I’m oblivious to. One time I walked in from outside and she was sitting quietly at the dinner table watching a fly walk over her hand.
We all ran around like ninnies trying to grab anything that might blow away in the wind, and we missed one of our vacuum cleaner’s filters, so that’s a goner.
We did jigsaw puzzles, played cards, and then Louis made creamy mushroom sauce, Joss ate an entire raw potato, and we all got dinner on the table, whereupon Joss ate more potatoes.

The thing about this way of life is, most days, it feels like we’re on holiday.