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How do we afford it?

We’ve had a disappointing week.

Part of our home education vision has always been to have a bit of land where the kids can build tree huts, have bon fires with their friends, learn about raising pets and growing vegetables, run around to their hearts’ content.

We have a rather long list of what we want in a property. One of the things is it needs to be close to the beach. Especially now that Louis is surfing, but even before that, one of our favourite things to do is pack a picnic and head to the beach for the day. In Hawke’s Bay, property near the beach is difficult to come by on our budget unless you head north to Wairoa or south to Pourere. Another thing on our list is that it needs to be within an hour of the airport for Ron’s commute. That puts Wairoa and Pourere out of the equation.

We are lucky enough to have bought a house eight years ago in an area of Napier that is seeing ridiculous growth in sales prices. We often have real estate agents knocking on our door asking if we’re in the market to sell. We climbed onto a false assumption that on the basis of that we might be able to afford our lifestyle block.

And we found one that fit nearly all our criteria. And we got excited. And we did all our due diligence and got to the point where we were going to put in an offer, only to get told by our mortgage broker that we couldn’t service the loan. What that means in everyday language is that we can’t afford to make the repayments on a week-to-week basis. According to the bank’s calculations.

This was a short, sharp drop back down to the reality of our financial situation. The one that we find ourselves in largely because we home-educate, which means we’re on one income, which means we’re limited to what Ron can earn.

We drive a 1992 Honda CRV with paint peeling off and a boot door that only shuts sometimes. I buy most of my clothes from op-shops. I buy most of the kids’ clothes off trade me. If you see them and they look tidy, they’ll be wearing clothes my mum or sister bought them. We spend a shit-load of money on food. And health; choosing alternative health practises, like osteopathy and homeopathy and acupuncture is freaking expensive.

We borrowed a crazy amount of money to buy the camper van. We worked in a frenzy to get the house ready to go on AirBnB so that that would pay for the loan. That paid off. But we’ll need to do it every summer to keep that up.

Sometimes it seems like the easiest thing would be to put the kids in school and go and get a job. But, then I remind myself that money is just one aspect of our lives. Healthy, well adjusted, thriving children far outweigh that. Children who are independent thinkers, who have a strong sense of who they are and where they fit in the world, are more important than what car we drive. A family that has fun together, and spontaneous days at the beach, and glorious mornings in the sunshine learning to ride bikes, is more important that me being at work and picking them up from school with extra cash in the bank.

For us.

This is how we afford it, by pivoting back to what matters whenever we get the money-wobbles.

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